Ipswich Architectural Walk

24 Roderick Street, Ipswich
Glorious well-maintained Queenslander which features weatherboard exterior, finely detailed timbered verandah with Arts & Crafts decoration, double entry steps and corrugated iron roof.

1858 - St Paul's Anglican Church, Brisbane Street, Ipswich
Completed in 1859, it is a rare example of a church built prior to Separation and is the oldest Anglican Church in Queensland; it also contains the oldest pipe organ in Queensland. The main church is a fine revival Gothic building constructed over a long period from 1855 to 1929. With its central city setting and landscaped grounds including a fine limestone wall and terraces, it is a major landmark in Ipswich. The church is closely associated with two important Queensland architects F.D.G. Stanley and G.B.Gill and also with Edmund Blacket and William Wakeling. The rectory is a finely-detailed example of a late Victorian residence and is a good example of the domestic work of G.B. Gill.

Ipswich Civic Hall, Brisbane Street, Ipswich
A strong, bold design in the Brutalist style. The reinforced concrete structure features a sharply sloped flat roof, creating a diagonal roof line which contrasts to the building's horizontal and vertical members.

1859-64 - Ipswich Town Hall, Brisbane Street, Ipswich, Qld
The hall section of this building was opened in 1861 as a School of Arts. The front section was added in 1864.

1899-1901 - Ipswich Post Office, Brisbane Street, Ipswich
A post office has stood on this site since 1862. The current building, in Federation Free style, was completed in 1901. When the Post Office was opened, Ipswich had two clocks side by side (post office and town hall), generally unsynchronised. This continued until 1912 when the Post Office clock was illuminated. Tenders were called in December 1912 for the sale of the Town Hall clock which was eventually sold to the Sandgate Town Council for their new council chambers.

1901 - Ipswich College, Cnr Ellenborough & Limestone Streets, Ipswich
Technical college classes commenced on a nearby site in 1891. This building, designed by G.B. Gill, was opened in 1901 and commemorated Queen Victoria's Jubilee.

1920-21 - Soldiers Memorial Hall, Nicholson Street, Ipswich
The Memorial Hall Ipswich demonstrates the patriotic fervour associated with World War I and the community's identification with the goals of the "mother country" Britain at this period in Queensland's history. It is a rare example of a very substantial brick soldiers' hall. The interior is generally intact and with the trend towards conversion of the larger halls for service clubs with poker machines, this is becoming rare. The Memorial Hall with its honour chamber, memorial tablets, meeting rooms, recreation rooms and offices demonstrates the characteristics and use of a hall for returned soldiers. The design of the building, in Federation Classical Free style, is the work of recognised local architect George Brockwell Gill and is a fine and typical example of his style at this period. Its facade features the soldier's badge motif of a rising sun in relief.

1926 - Booeebie, 75 Chermside Rd, Newtown, Ipswich
Designed by renowned Ipswich architect Will Haenke, the distinctive Californian Bungalow style was derived from information sent home by his brother Mark, who had emigrated to California shortly after the San Francisco earthquake in the early 1900s. The residence was originally occupied by their other brother Harry and his family who resided at Booeebie until shortly after the bombing of Pearl Harbour in December 1941, before relocating to Brisbane. The front facade of the residence consists of a large gabled front verandah, which is accessed by wide sweeping steps.

Ipswich Court House, East Street, Ipswich
Built in 1859 to a design by Charles Tiffin, this former court house was built to a Romanesque design out of sandstone and brick. Subsequent additions were made in 1866 and 1924 to the original building. In the early years of Ipswich, the building was used for public meetings as well as a court house. The original building consisted of the central sandstone courtroom with a vestibule at the front, flanked by two brick wings. The building was too small for its task by 1904. In 1936, a major extension in rendered brickwork was made to the west, adding a new court room and ancillary rooms with the entry off Ginn St. With this addition, the building was able to continue its function until a new Court House was built on a different site in 1982. The State Government carried out conservation work in the 1970s and 1980s. After the building ceased being used as a courthouse, the bench was moved to the original court room and the building became a community cultural centre.

1858 - Central Mission, Ipswich Uniting Church, Ellenborough Street, Ipswich
The oldest church in Queensland in continuous use, it is substantially the work of the important Brisbane architect Benjamin Backhoues. The earliest portions are in now rendered brickwork although originally in tuck pointed brick and the 1892 extensions in fair face brickwork with rendered quoins, cappings and string courses. Internally, walls are rendered to an ashlar pattern and the ceiling is diagonally boarded over an elaborate scissor truss.The Gothic Revival style building features elaborate scissor roof trusses and diagonal ceiling boarding.

1863 - Toronto, 30 Quarry Street, Ipswich
Toronto, formerly called Devonshire Cottage, was built during a period of great prosperity in Ipswich when the town was considered a leading commercial centre, strongly contesting Brisbane as Queensland's premier city. It is indicative of the influx of wealthy settlers that moved into the area during the early 1860's in direct response to the town's prosperity. he house is an early, intact and rare surviving example of the Carpenter Gothic style of architecture, typically used for domestic applications in the Ipswich region but also throughout Queensland. The unusual style of the two storey, timber house gives the building considerable aesthetic significance with its prominent gables, decorative scalloped bargeboards, traceried timber verandah and intimate scale.

Ipswich Grammar School, Burnett Street, Ipswich
The steep roofed Gothic buildings are the oldest part of the school. The first section was built in 1863, and was designed by architect Benjamin Backhouse. The clocktower was added two years later. The complex's modern circular buildings are dormitories.

1904 - St Mary's Catholic Church, Elizabeth Street, Ipswich
Built of Halidon stone, its Perpendicular Gothic design was based on a design by F.D.G. Stanley. The first presbytery, a timber cottage, was built in 1860, but by the 1870s was in extremely poor condition. The congregation of St Mary's and the parish priest at the time, Father Horan, agreed to build a more substantial building. The present presbytery, built in 1876, was designed by the Italian architect Andrea Stombuco who had moved to Brisbane in 1875. This structure is the oldest building in the St Mary's Precinct. The Neo-Classical style building was built of stone and plastered inside and out with Portland cement. St Mary's Presbytery is a two storeyed stone building constructed in the manner of an Italian villa, to the design of the architect Andrea Stombuco. It is rectangular in plan with a stair hall leading to four rooms at each level.

1904 - St Mary's Catholic Church, Elizabeth Street, Ipswich
Built of Helidon stone, it was based on a design by F.D.G. Stanley. The first presbytery, a timber cottage, was built in 1860, but by the 1870s was in extremely poor condition. The congregation of St Mary's and the parish priest at the time, Father Horan, agreed to build a more substantial building. The present presbytery, built in 1876, was designed by the Italian architect Andrea Stombuco who had moved to Brisbane in 1875. This structure is the oldest building in the St Mary's Precinct. The Neo-Classical style building was built of stone and plastered inside and out with Portland cement. St Mary's Presbytery is a two storeyed stone building constructed in the manner of an Italian villa, it is rectangular in plan with a stair hall leading to four rooms at each level.

1936. Ipswich Incinerator, Queens Park, Ipswich
The Ipswich Incinerator is one of a number of Walter Burley Griffin designed incinerator buildings erected around Australia by the local municipalities for burning the city's garbage. American architect Walter Burley Griffin designed Canberra, the National Capital. The only example of Griffin's work in Queensland, it comprises two interlocking gable-roofed brick structures set into a hillside in a fashion not dissimilar to the municipal incinerator in the Sydney suburb of Willoughby designed by the same architect. The structure features two brick chimneys, one of which was added in 1940.
To implement the processing of rubbish, the incinerator was built into a hill to allow road access to the top and bottom of the building. On the upper level, trucks carrying rubbish backed in through roller doors and dumped their cargo into hoppers. The refuse was then raked into two burning chambers. Unburned residue was doused with water then hauled by electric motor to an area to the west of the incinerator. The building was initially designed with one chimney, but adding a second work unit and chimney in 1940 extended its capacity. As Griffin was by then dead, it is assumed that his partner, Eric Nicholls, designed these.
The incinerator was designed to process the rubbish generated by a city of 20,000 people, but by 1960 the population of Ipswich was twice this number. Moreover, by this time it was no longer thought environmentally appropriate to dispose of rubbish by burning. Use of the incinerator was therefore discontinued and as the empty building began to be targeted by vandals, in 1965 the council considered demolishing it. Since 1969, it has been home to the Ipswich Little Theatre.

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