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Place Names: Victoria - Melbourne's Streets

On 1st October 1836 Colonel William Lonsdale arrived in Melbourne in HMS Rattlesnake to take up his aqppointment of Police Magistrate at 'Bearbrass on Yarro Yarro', the early name of the settlement that would become the City of Melbourne. At that time, it consisted of 43 dwellings, 224 European inhabitants and pastures accommodating 40,000 sheep. Within five years the colony had grown in size to 5,000 people and land speculation was rife. Lonsdale predicted the rush soon after arrival and commissioned surveyor Robert Hoddle to lay out a townsite. The town plan was a standard one approved by the British Colonial Office for new settlements overseas - an uncomplicated grid of streets crossing one another at right angles. In the case of Melbourne it was slightly varied to provide service lanes (named after their corresponding thoroughfares, but with the prefix 'Little') running parallel to the main east-west thoroughfares.
The plan provided thoroughfares with a width of 99 feet (30.8 metres) which suited Melbourne's topography and was repeated in subdivisions of land for subsequent suburban development for decades to come. Governor Bourke named the new settlement, after Viscount Melbourne, the British Prime Minister, and named the streets after his wife Elizabeth, the Royal Family, early explorers and other eminent people of the era.
It is also worth noting that Governor Bourke named Melbourne after the British Prime Minister of the time whereas Williamstown was named after the king. This would seem to indicate that he thought of Williamstown as the more important settlement.
The streets of Melbourne listed here are the thoroughfares set out by Hoddle in the original city block, bounded by Spencer, Flinders, Spring and La Trobe Streets, as well as the maze of lanes and alleys added later as the city grew. The streets in the left column below are those which have were laid out from east to west, between Flinders Street and La Trobe Street; the streets in the right column below are those which were laid out from north to south, between Spencer and Spring Streets.
Map of Melbourne Central Business District

NB: the streets are listed as they are found from south to north, the from east to west.

Streets running South to North

Wellington Parade: probably named after the Duke of Wellington.

Batman Avenue: recalls the founder of Melbourne, John Batman. He had the potential to become one of the more revered names in Australian history. He is the only native-born Australian to found a state capital city. He spoke Aboriginal languages and was one of the few people of his time to attempt to compensate Aborigines for the use of their land. In fact, had things turned out differently, Melbourne might now be known by one the names proposed early in its settlement - Batmania!

Flinders Street: recalls Matthew Flinders, navigator and lieutenant of the British Royal Navy, who performed a variety of exploratory journeys charting the Australian coastline. He was the first person to circumnavigate Australia and it was upon his suggestion that Australia adopted its name.

Mercantile Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Delgraves Place: Merchant pastoralist William Delgraves built a steam driven flour mill on this site in 1851.

Flinders Lane: a service lane parallel to Flinders Street.

Beaney Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Collins Street: recalls David Collins (1754-1810), who first attempted settlement of the Port Phillip District in 1803 at Sorrento. His colony, on the Mornington Peninsula, was shortlived, and within a year had moved to Ridson Cove, Tasmania (near present day Hobart).

Francis Street: Merchant politician JG Francis held the Trade & Customs portfolio in 1886 when the Government Shipping Offices were built here fronting Spencer Street.

St James Lane: recalls St James Church of England, established 1839, which was relocated from William Street to King Street, West Melbourne, in 1913.

Temple Lane: see Temple Court Place.

Roszlier Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Mitre Lane: the haunt of artists, lawyers and writers, the name recalls the high-gabled Mite Travern, licenced since 1867.

Presgrave Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Ulster Lane: recalls the Ulster Family Hotel on the corner of Spring and Little Collins Streets.

Little Collins Street: a service lane parallel to Collins Street.

Donaldson Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Bourke Street: recalls Major-General Sir Richard Bourke, Governor of the colony of New South Wales, 3rd December, 1831 to 5th December, 1837. Melbourne was within the boundaries of New South Wales during Bourke's tunure as Governor.

Turner Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Golden Fleece Alley: recalls Russell Street's Golden Fleece Hotel.

Mornane Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Turnbull Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Little Bourke Street: a service lane parallel to Bourke Street.

Belman Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Smythe Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Lonsdale Street: recalls Captain William Lonsdale (1799-1864) of the 4th Regiment Infantry who acted as police magistrate and commander of the settlement from 1st October 1835. He had arrived in Sydney in December 1831 with a detachment of troops guarding convicts in the Bussorah Merchant. During the next five years he served in Van Diemen's Land and in New South Wales. In July 1834 he was promoted captain and on 6th April 1835, while stationed at Port Macquarie, he married Martha, the youngest daughter of Benjamin Smythe, civil engineer of Launceston. During his two years in Victoria, friction developed between Lonsdale and other civil officials who disputed his right to supervise their activities. The surveyors, Robert Russell and Robert Hoddle, would not recognize that he had any authority beyond that of a police magistrate, and Lonsdale complained that a missionary to the Aboriginals, George Langhorne, was subverting his authority. He was relieved by Charles La Trobe in October 1839.

Lonsdale Lane: additional service lane to Lonsdale Street.

Drewery Alley / Drewery Lane: recalls Chemist Thomas Drewery who was elected as a City Councillor for the Gipps Ward in 1851.

Sanders Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Little Lonsdale Street: a service lane parallel to Lonsdale Street.

Flannigan Lane: Architects John Flanagan Snr and Jnr who designed the now demolished Estaern Market.

Guildford Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

McLean Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

McIntyre Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

La Trobe Street: Charles La Trobe (1801-1875), who was appointed Superintendant of the Port Phillip District, arriving from England in September 1839. He took up the post in October 1839, replacing Capt. William Lonsdale. In his wake the colony established of a separate police force, a customs office and, perhaps most importantly, a separate Lands Office.

A'Beckett Street: named after Victoria's first chief justice Sir William A'Beckett.

Centre Place: believed to recall either a business or trader at this locality, or to refer to its position..

Howey Place: a shopping arcade formerly known as "Cole's Walk". In 1896, Edward William Cole, the developer of the famous Cole's Book Arcade, covered the lane with a glass canopy and created glass showcases along the street to attract tenants which included a Cole's wholesale bookstore, a toy department store and printing shop. Howey House, a tall art-deco building and part of the Collins Street in the 1930s once connected the lane to Collins Street via an open laneway, however Howey House was demolished in the 1980s for the construction of the Sportsgirl Centre, a modern shopping mall.

Streets running East to West

Spencer Street: Lord George John Spencer (1782-1845). He was notably Chancellor of the Exchequer the Whig government under Lord Grey from 1830 to 1834. He was also the first president of the Royal Agricultural Society (founded 1838), and a notable cattle-breeder.

Godfrey Street: formed by a subdivision in the 1880s, it was probably named after a developer.

Langs Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Cosgrave Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Cleve Lane: Cleve Brothers built a bonded store in Lonsdale Street in 1854. The expanded their business to the King Street corner in 1862.

Rose Alley: recalls hay and corn merchant Alexander Rose who conducted his business from King Street premises.

Pender Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Uniacke Court: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Merriman Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Elliott Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Alston Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Warner Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Nicholson Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

King Street: recalls either Phillip Gidley King, an early Govenor of NSW, or King William IV (right), the third son of King George III (1765-1837). In 1830, on the death of his brother George IV, William became King and was the reigning monarch when Melbourne was founded.

Highlander Lane: from Royal Highlanders Hotel in Flinders Street.

Customs House Lane: A lane which services the rear entry of Customs House, built in 1841 on a narrow block between William and Market Streets by Robert Russell in 1841.

Geddes Lane: Engineer and machinist William Geddes who operated from premises in Collins Street.

McCrackens Lane: McCracken's Collins Street brewery produced stout and ales from 1851 until it became part of Carlton & United Breweries in 1907.

Church Lane: recalls St James Church of England, established 1839, which was relocated from William Street to King Street, West Melbourne, in 1913.

Henty Lane: recalls the pastoralist Henty family who established Henty & Co., a merchant and shipping agency in Little Collins Street in 1851.

Gresham Street: formed in late 1880s, the name was first listed in 1933. Thought to recall a local business.

Ramsay Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Goldsborough Lane: A service lane to the back of the Goldsborough Mort warehouse erected on the corner of William and Bourke Streets.

Brown Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Merritts Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Crombie Lane: the late was created in the early 1850s and was one of Melbourne's first laneways. It is believed to have been named after Lonsdale Street drapers and importers, Crombie, Clapperton & Findlay.

Guests Lane: recalls the primisesof biscuit maker, TB Guest & Co. which were located here. The lane gave side entry to its premises.

Manton Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Healeys Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Chisholm Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Wicklow Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Eagle Alley: an old right-of-way that became Eahle Alley in 1890, though the name applied originally to only the 'dog-leg' section.

Park Street: named because of its proximity to Flagstaff Gardens. It was created in 1877 to allow access between LaTrobe and Little lonsdale Streets.

Brights Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Alsops Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

William Street: recalls William IV, the third son of King George III (1765-1837). In 1830, on the death of his brother George IV, William became King. He was King when Melbourne was founded.

Market Street: The street became a boundary of the Melbourne General Markets established on the corner of William Street and Flinders Lane in 1837.

Foxton Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Tavistock Place: named as a lane in 1865, possibly after Tavistock House wshich stood in Flinders Lane.

Harper Lane: recalls merchant and Federal MP Rolbert Harper, who had a tea, coffee, spice, flour and oatmeal business in Flinders Lane from 1865.

Moylans Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Samuel Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Gurners Lane: recalls Henry Gurner, Crown Solicitor from 1841-80, who lived in William Street until 1854.

Temple Court Place: it was home of the legal profession and named for one of London's Inns of Court.

Bank Place: the Bank of Australasia built premises here facing Collins Street in 1840 on land purchased from CH Ebden. It was rebuilt in 1858 on the Queen Street corner.

Austral Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality, possibly a hotel.

Kitz Lane: Swiss born wine merchant Louis Kitz had stores in Bourke and Collins Streets, and also in Geelong.

Michaels Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Little William Street: a short service lane parallel to William Street, however it was not included in Hoddle's original plan of Melbourne.

Thomson Street: recalls Thomson & Co., brassfounders and coppersmiths, who operated in Little Bourke Street c.1880-1950.

Little Queen Street: a short service lane parallel to Queen Street, however it was not included in Hoddle's original plan of Melbourne.

St Patricks Alley: near St Patrick's Hall in Little Bourke Street. It hosted Victoria's first Legislative Council, 1851-56.

Merlin Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Benjamin Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

St Johns Lane: believed to recall either a business or trader at this locality, or it being near St Johns Church.

Barry Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Sampson Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Queen Street: recalls the consort to King William IV, and Queen Adelaide. The compliment would have been more marked and the name more distinctive, if they had called it Adelaide Street, but wasn't so as to match King Street.

Bond Street: numerous import merchants established bond stores there after Melbourne was granted full Customs port status in 1840.

Commerce Way: numerous import businesses operated from premises in the vicinity.

Mill Place: believed to recall a mill at this locality.

Flinders Court: a laneway leading onto Flinders Street.

Ryrie Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Fulham Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Bligh Place: recalls merchants Bligh & Harbottle who traded from premises in Little Bourke Street.

Staughton Alley: pastoralist and banker Simon Staughton, who died in 1865. He was a stockholder in Flinders Lane.

Briscoe Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Collins Way: a laneway leading onto Little Collins Street.

Fleming Place:

Equitable Place: the premises of Equitable Life Assurance were built on the Collins-Elizabeth Street corner by Dame Nellie Melba's father, David Mitchell.

Penfold Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

McKillop Street: named in 1856, possibly after Scottish accountant and estate agent, JP McKillop, who operated his businesss activities here.

Gills Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Kirk Lane: originally Kirk's Lane, recalls Kirks Horse Bazaar, a business which once operated here between Swanston and Queen Street. Kirk's was a horse and livery trading centre built in 1840 by James Bowie Kirk.

Hardware Street: Named after Hardware House in the 1920s, Hardware Lane was built on land formerly occupied by Kirk's Horse Bazaar, a horse and livery trading centre built in 1840 by James Bowie Kirk.

Platypus Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Racing Club Lane: the Racing Club Hotel and the offices of the Victorian Racing Club were located nearby.

Warburton Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Rankins Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Somerset Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Crown Place: Crown Hotel, on the corner of Lonsdale and Queen Streets.

Goldie Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Niagara Lane: a laneway access to the side of the Niagara Hotel.

Whitehart Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Finlay Lane: possibly for John Finlay, road contractor, pastoralist and later St Kilda resident.

Timothy Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Heape Court: Benjamin Heape, pastoralist merchant, of Heape & Co., little Lonsdale Street.

Sutherland Street: forst listed in 1865, possibly for solicitor RA Sutherland.

Zevenboom Lane: Dutch born John Zevenboom who launched the southern hemisphere's first brush-making business nearby.

Elizabeth Street: the writings of Mr. Hoddle indicate it may have been named for Elizabeth (1558 - 1603), the Virgin Queen of English history (right). It has also been stated that it recalls Elizabeth Bourke, wife of Major-General Sir Richard Bourke, Governor of the colony of New South Wales, 3rd December, 1831 to 5th December, 1837. Melbourne was within the boundaries of New South Wales during Bourke's tunure as Governor. Mrs Bourke had died in 1832. A Melbourne publication has also claimed that the naming of Elizabeth Street was a compliment paid by Sir Richard Bourke to one of his daughters. That it was named after Queen Elizabeth seems the most likely explanation as it fits the pattern of naming of nearby streets in Hoddle's grid.

Rothsay Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Lingham Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Degraves Street: merchant pastoralist William Degraves built a steam driven flour mill on this site in 1851.

Royston Place: formerly Weres Alley, after stockbroker JB Were, who migrated to Australia in 1839. His name remains incorporated in a modern firm. Royston is believed to have been a local businessman who had premises there.

Scott Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Cocker Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Central Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality or for its location.

Flinders Way: a right of way created to give access to Flinders Street.

Manchester Lane: it was adjecent to numerous fabric and softgoods warehouses in nearby Flinders Lane.

Monaghan Place: Thomas Monaghan of Queens Arms Hotel, cnr Swanston Street and Flinders Lane from 1845.

Balcombe place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Block Place: it gave access to Block Arcade, built 1893. 'Doing The Block' was the local term for the afternoon shopping and social promenade along this section of Collins Street.

Brown Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Carson Place: featuring an elaborate facade, Carson's quality footwear shop in Collins Street prospered in the gold rush era.

Howey Place: recalls Henry Howey, pastoralist and the first purchaser of land on the corner of Swanston and Collins Streets, 1837.

Clyde Way: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

The Causeway/Causeway Lane: origin not known.

Union Lane: recalls the Union Hotel in Little Collins Street in 1860s.

Sugden Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Masons Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Angelo Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Staughton Place: see Staughton Alley.

Buckley Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Albion Alley: the Albion Hotel in Bourke Street was the terminus for Cobb & Vo. stage coaches.

Louden Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Driver Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Lynch Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Arcade Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Caledonian Lane: recalls the Caledonian Hotel, near corner of Swanston and Lonsdale Streets, originally a 13-room house built by Prebyterian minister JP Clow in 1839.

Knox Place / Lane: Reverend James Forbes built the John Knox Church for his Free and Protestant Church of Australia on the corner of Little Lonsdale and Swanston Streets in 1846. The lane gave side access to the church.

Swanston Street: recalls Captain Charles Swanston, a Tasmanian banker and prominent member of the Port Phillip Association and the Chairman of the Batman Association. Swanston was perhaps the first great pioneering farmer and businessman of the new colony.

Chapter House Lane: Robert Hoddle included the lane when surveying the site in 1848 for St Paul's Church, rebuilt as the Cathedral in 1880s.

Watson Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Rutledge Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Hosier Lane: recalls the premises of a business of that name in the locality.

Athenaeum Place: named for Athena, the Greek godess of Wisdom, the Athenaeum was the rebuilt Mechanics Institute. It now hosts a library, club and theatre.

Baptist Place: recalls the Collins Street Baptist chapel, built in 1846 and designed by John Gill. Its Corinthian portico, designed by Reed and Barnes, was added in 1862.

Rainbow Alley: recalls the Rainbow Hotel, cnr Swanston and Little Collins Streets.

Russell Place: a short service lane parallel to Russell Street, however it was not included in Hoddle's original plan of Melbourne.

Portland Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Star Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality, probably the Star Hotel.

La Trobe Place: recalls Governor LaTrobe.

Dean Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Bullens Lane: recalls clothiers Frederick Bullen & Sonof Little Bourke Street, 1880s.

Stevensons lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Globe Alley: Globe Hoel, cnr Swanston and Little Bourke Streets.

Tattersalls Lane: Tattersalls Hotel and Tattersalls Club located nearby in Bourke Street.

Celestial Avenue: the name is associated with the ancient Chinese Celestial empire, ruled by heavenly beings. The name was probably given by Chinese merchants who traded nearby.

Hefferman Lane: Rody Hefferman owned the Melbourne Hotel (later Centenary Hotel) in Lonsdale Street.

Waratah Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Russell Street: recalls Robert Russell, who trained as an architect and surveyor at Edinburgh, Scotland, and in 1832 came to Sydney where he was given a position in the survey office. In September 1836 he was sent to Port Phillip with instructions to survey the bay and its surroundings. Early in March 1837 Governor Bourke and Robert Hoddle visited Melbourne and, under instructions from Bourke, Hoddle surveyed and made a plan for the city of Melbourne. Hoddle used the plan prepared by Russell as a basis, but his survey was the official survey, and even if it owed something to Russell's preliminary survey. Russell later practised as an architect in Melbourne until he was forced to retire by old age. St James' Church was designed by him.

Oliver Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Higson Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

ACDC Lane: formerly called Corporation Lane (because it led to the Council's works depot), but was renamed on 1st October 2004 as a tribute to Australian rock band AC/DC. The trademark lightning bolt or slash ("/") used to separate the AC and the DC in the band's name contravened the naming policy of the Office of the Registrar of Geographic Names, so the punctuation was omitted on the street sign. The lane contains a rock 'n' roll nightclub called the Cherry Bar. Corporation Lane was chosen for renaming in part because the band filmed the music video for "It's a Long Way to the Top (If You Wanna Rock 'n' Roll)" on Melbourne's Swanston Street and actually set off from Corporation Lane.
The legendary AC/DC video clip, shot in Swanston Street between Bourke Street and Flinders Street on the back of a truck - a blue ABC-owned flat-bed - was hatched by the late AC/DC singer Bon Scott and ABC-TV's Countdown host Molly Meldrum. It was supposed to refer to the Moomba parade and was shot on three cameras. The budget, according to Drane, was $380. Three pipers from the Rats of Tobruk pipe band were hired for the song's characteristic bagpipe solo.

Duckboard Place: adjacent to Duckboard House, an entertainment centre for troops during World War II.

Malthouse Lane: Samuel Burston's five-storey steam and gas powered malthouse produced superiior malt for brewing from 1869.

George Parade: name changed from La Trobe Parade in 1924. Its present name recalls the Henry George Club, named for the political theorist, who established his headquarters there.

Chester Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

St Michael's Walk: it was in the vicinity of St Michael's church.

Alfred Place: either named after a migrant ship, or for Prince Alfred, as the name came into use around the time of his birth - 6th August 1844. Prince Alfred visited Australia as the Duke of Edinburgh (1844–1900) in 1867-68. Whilst in Sydney, there was an unsuccessful assassination attempt on his life at a garden tea party i the suburb of Clontarf.

Pink Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Melbourne Place: the reason for the name of this lane is unknown.

Coromandel Place: recalls a ship from Plymouth, England, which arrived at Port Phillip with settlers in July 1840.

Coverlid Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Brien Place: the lane is opposite the former Eastern Market where butcher Joseph Brien operated his business from 1848.

Croft Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Market Lane: close to the former Eastern Market.

Lees Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Corrs Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Pender Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Lacey Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Cohen Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Hayward Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Jones Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Davidsons Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Bennetts Lane: Robert Bennett MLA, Lord Mayor of Melbourne, 1861-62.

Exploration Lane: Little Lonsdale Street's Exploration Hotel was probably named for the doomed Burke & Wills Expedition, 1860-61.

Evans Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.


Royal Exhibition Building

Exhibition Street: originally called Stephens Street. after WJ Stephens, Under Secretary of the Colonial Office. It was renamed Exhibition Street when the Royal Exhibition Building at the top of the street in Carlton Gardens was completed in 1879.

Spark Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Throssell Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Howitt Lane: Dr Godfrey Howitt's renowned prefabricated wooden cottage was nearby at the top of Collins Street from 1840.

McGraths Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Club Lane: gave rear access to the Melbourne Club (estab. 1838). Renamed from Collins Lane after the Club's Collins Street premises were built in 1859.

Ridgway Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Coates Lane: grazier Walter Coates purchased property on the Yarra's northern banks in 1840.

Westwood Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

McIlwraith Place: formerly Lilly Lane, after 1840s estate agent James Lilly. John Mcilwraith, shipowner and manufacturer of plumbing goods, was Lord Mayor of Melbourne, 1873-74.

Meyers Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Windsor Place: built in 1883, the Windsor Hotel (formerly the Grand Hotel) became a place of temperance as the Grand Coffee Palace and re-emerged as the licensed Windsor Hotel in 1920.

Crossley Street: formerly Juliet Terrace which, like neighbouring Romeo Lane (now Liverpool Street), recalls the famous Shakespearian characters often featured at a theatre nearby. The street became a part of a red light district and had its name changed to bring it some respectability.

Liverpool Street: formerly Romeo Lane which, like neighbouring Juliet Terrace, recalls the famous Shakespearian characters often featured at a theatre nearby. The street became a part of a red light district and had its name changed to bring it some respectability.

Harwood Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Punch Lane: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Little Bourke Place: a service lane giving access to Little Bourke Street.

Little Leichardt Street: recalls explorer Ludwig Leichhardt.

Gorman Alley: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Casseldon Place: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Griffin Lane: hay and corn merchant William Griffin operated his business from premises in Little Collins Street in the 1850s.

Burton Street: believed to recall a business or trader at this locality.

Spring Street: the reason for naming it thus is not known, however it is believed that the street, when pegged out, was so far away in the 'bush', and passed over such a smooth, grassy, picturesquely timbered stretch of country, up a beautiful hill from the Yarra across towards the Carlton Gardens, that either Governor or surveyor was induced by the fragrance of the gum trees and the freshness of the day, to present a votive offering to the goddess of Spring. This fanciful surmise has been singularly sustained by the testimony of Mr. Hoddle, to the effect that when Sir Richard Bourke and he arrived on the crown of the Eastern Hill, there was such an abundance of beautiful black and white wattle trees growing where the Parliament House and Treasury are built, that the Governor, in a fit of happy inspiration pronounced in favour of 'Spring' Street. Another suggestion is that the Governor Bourke intended it as a compliment to Thomas Spring Rice, afterwards Lord Monteagle, a once distinguished British statesman, the private friend and political patron of Bourke and Chancellor of the Exchecquer.