Boddington

A small farming community located on the banks of the Hotham River. The town was given a new lease of life when bauxite mining commenced near the town in 1979. The opening of a gold mine seven years later has further strengthened its economy.

Ranford Pool

A 2km walk trail along the river provides wheelchair access between the caravan park and Ranford Pool, a favourite fishing, birdwatching and picnic place. Another favourite picnic and fishing spot is Lions Weir closer to town.

Fishing is great in Spring or Autumn in the deep pools of the river. Redfin perch and cobbler, along with marron (freshwater lobster). A Recreational Fishing Licence is required. Application forms available from Post Offices, Fishing Western Australia or the local Department of Environment & Conservation (DEC) office.


Grave of Quency Dilyan

Perhaps the most interesting historical attractions in the area are the lonely grave of Quency Dilyan, an Aborigine who helped Alexander Forrest and H. S. Ranford on their expeditions. Dilyan's grave, which is on the Boddington Road out of town, is marked by a Royal Historical Society plaque.


Marradong

Further along Bannister Road is the tiny settlement of Marradong. It was the major centre in the region until the railway arrived in Boddington. Today it is literally nothing more than tiny St Albans Anglican church (1894), the old agricultural hall and some palms which once stood outside the local hotel.


Touring the Area

The local shire, in an attempt to attract tourism to the town, has created a series of five tours around the district. These tours include a 35 km drive to Tullis Bridge, the site of a timber mill and trestle bridge which is now a picnic spot.

There is also the Marradong, Quindanning and Lower Hotham 90 km drive which visits Dilyan's grave. the remnants of Marradong and the Worsley Bauxite Mining Project, the scenic Mooradung Circuit (45 km), Camballing Capers (35 km through pleasant forested areas) and the Tumlo and Long Gully Bridge route (90 km) which passes through forests and includes the Long Gully trestle bridge.


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Where is it?

123 km south east of Perth


With nearly half the Shire of Boddington being taken up with forests it is natural that most of these drives travel through the local forests which are promoted as ideal places to hike, picnic and search for wildflowers.

Brief history

The Boddington area was settled in the mid-1860s and grew slowly to become well known for its wool and wheat production. The town itself was named after a local shepherd, Henry Boddington, when the railway line arrived in the district to meet a demand which had been created by the local timber industry.

Marradong was originally the centre of the area and the local road board was founded there in 1892. The only structures remaining are a centenary old church and a few old homes in varying states of repair. Marradong was the centre of Local Government until 1925 when a new building was built in Boddington which replaced the old site.

Boddington was gazetted as a town in 1912. The town was given a new lease of life when bauxite mining commenced near the town in 1979. The opening of a gold mine seven years later has further strengthened its economy.

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